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Article
July 1937

A REVIEW OF UROLOGIC SURGERY

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES; SAN FRANCISCO; BUDAPEST, HUNGARY; SEATTLE; NEW YORK; ROCHESTER, MINN.; CHICAGO

Arch Surg. 1937;35(1):162-210. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1937.01190130165010
Abstract

KIDNEY 

Anomalies.  —Shih and Char1 stated that congenital solitary kidney may be defined as an anomalous condition in which one kidney is absent because of a disturbance of growth of the nephrogenic tissue in embryonic life and the existing kidney has developed from one renal bud. If the solitary kidney is healthy, congenital absence of the opposite kidney does not give rise to pathognomonic symptoms, and the condition may exist for years without the patient being aware of it.It cannot be overemphasized that recognition of solitary kidney is of paramount importance and should merit the great concern of the urologic surgeon. A congenital solitary kidney is compatible with normal physiologic function, and a patient with this anomaly maintains full working capacity. The condition is of clinical significance only in the presence of renal disease.Operation should be recommended only when it is absolutely imperative, and surgical procedures should

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