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Article
December 1937

ALTERATIONS IN THE HIP JOINT AFTER DEAFFERENTATION

Author Affiliations

STANFORD UNIVERSITY, CALIF.
From the Department of Anatomy, Stanford University.

Arch Surg. 1937;35(6):1145-1158. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1937.01190180117009
Abstract

In studying the effect of lumbar sympathectomy and section of the lumbosacral dorsal roots on the structure of bones and joints in adult cats, a condition closely simulating the arthritic changes in malum coxae senilis of man was found in deafferented hip joints.

The numerous experimental procedures on animals, such as the rabbit, dog, cat and guinea-pig, which have resulted in conditions simulating arthritis deformans in man were reviewed by Burckhardt,1 Mannheim2 and Key.3 These experiments usually included intracapsular traumatization or destruction of a portion of the articular cartilage and resulted in the acceptance by many of the thesis that degeneration of articular cartilage is a primary condition in the production of the senile type of chronic hypertrophic arthritis in man. Axhausen4 has been the foremost exponent of this concept. From his experimental work on dogs, Wollenberg5 concluded that degenerative alterations in a joint are

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