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Article
January 1938

BEHAVIOR OF THE SYSTEMIC BLOOD PRESSURE, PULSE RATE AND SPINAL FLUID PRESSUREASSOCIATED WITH ACUTE CHANGES IN INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE ARTIFICIALLY PRODUCED

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the Department of Neurosurgery of the Kings County Hospital (Dr. Jefferson Browder, Director) and the Department of Neurology of the Bellevue Hospital (Dr. Foster Kennedy, Director).

Arch Surg. 1938;36(1):1-19. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1938.01190190004001
Abstract

In a previous paper1 it was indicated that many of the commonly employed hypotheses concerning the physiologic factors at work in a patient suffering from an acute expanding lesion of the intracranial cavity are open to challenge. The historical development of these hypotheses was traced, and specific attention was called to the wide disparities of opinion among present day surgeons concerning the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of trauma to the brain. In an attempt to account for the existence of such widely differing views among those of apparently equal authority, it seemed to us that a considerable degree of responsibility might be referred to the almost universal acceptance some thirty years ago of certain principles which had their origin in animal experimentation2 and to the persistent effort on the part of the clinician to interpret cases in human beings directly in terms of these principles. The principles referred

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