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Article
March 1938

EFFECT OF PASSING RENAL BLOOD THROUGH LIVER IN DOGS WITH EXPERIMENTAL HYPERTENSION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Surgery of the New York Hospital and Cornell Medical College.

Arch Surg. 1938;36(3):376-380. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1938.01190210005002
Abstract

For many years it has been recognized that the liver has as one of its functions a detoxifying action. It excretes certain heavy metals, dysentery toxin and ricin into the bile.1 It has been shown that the injection of phenol, benzoic acid and phenoltetrachlorphthalein in amounts which normally produce no reaction may prove fatal in hepatectomized dogs.1 It is known that in the absence of the liver amino acids injected into an animal are not destroyed.2 Numerous observers have suggested that the liver protects the body from both endogenous and exogenous poisons. The liver takes up the bulk of chemical poisons, removes chloroform and phenol from the organism and protects it against the alkaloids. Most of these actions of the liver are based on the so-called glycuronic acid synthesis, whereby glycogen unites with these substances to form corresponding acids which are removed by the kidney. Many times the

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