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Article
April 1938

NONSPECIFIC MESENTERIC ADENITISA REPORT OF ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the surgical departments of the Morrisania City Hospital and the Bronx Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1938;36(4):571-585. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1938.01190220013002
Abstract

There is an ever present fear in the minds of surgeons of failing to recognize acute appendicitis. High mortality and prolonged morbidity are still prevalent as a result of delayed operative intervention. On the other hand, the frequently expressed opinion that it is better to operate in cases in which the diagnosis is incorrect than to overlook a bad appendix has carried physicians far afield. As a result of this state of mind, little thought is given to many diseases presenting symptoms that closely resemble the syndrome of acute appendicitis. The pathologic report on a removed appendix is often no criterion of the actual condition of the abdomen. Such changes as congestion or cellular infiltration are frequently only a comparatively small part of a pathologic process originating elsewhere in the abdomen.

It is of comparatively recent date that mesenteric adenitis has received some attention in medical literature; many of the

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