April 1938


Author Affiliations

Associate Attending Orthopedic Surgeon; Adjunct Attending Orthopedic Surgeon NEW YORK
From the service of Dr. Harry Finkelstein at the Hospital for Joint Diseases.

Arch Surg. 1938;36(4):660-671. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1938.01190220102007

During the past year or so we have had an opportunity of studying a number of patients, all of whom presented such strikingly similar symptoms as to warrant their being grouped together as having a definite clinical entity. Typically, there were sharply localized pain and tenderness over the area around the pisiform bone; a pathognomonic limitation of motion at the wrist; occasional signs suggesting an inflammatory reaction; a characteristic roentgenogram, and early subsidence of symptoms. When we referred to the literature for some help in understanding the condition, we were afforded scant assistance. Except for a single case reported by Cohen1 and the casual statement of Codman2 that he knew "of one case in the flexor carpi ulnaris," no mention could be found of the condition, either in the clinical or in the roentgenologic literature. Neither Codman nor Cohen presented any histologic evidence to justify their belief that

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