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Article
November 1938

MAGGOT THERAPY FOR HEMATOGENOUS OSTEOMYELITIS OF THE TIBIA

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Osteomyelitis Clinic, the Surgical Research Laboratory and the Fifth (Harvard) Surgical Service of the Boston City Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1938;37(5):811-820. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1938.01200050117010
Abstract

When Baer1 announced in 1929 that he was using live blowfly maggots to treat osteomyelitis, there was a decided wave of interest throughout the United States. Many surgeons began using the method, and enthusiastic reports2 appeared in the literature. After this preliminary wave of enthusiasm the use of maggots became more limited, but certain clinics have continued the practice. At present it is difficult to evaluate the method from the literature or to determine how widely it is used.

The purpose of this communication is to present in some detail a series of 29 cases in which hematogenous osteomyelitis of the tibia has been treated during the past seven years and which have been followed up to the time of writing. Most of the patients had been operated on by other surgeons, and treatment with maggots was begun after a period of antecedent treatment. Any additional operations were

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