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Article
March 1939

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF CALORIMETRIC CHANGES IN THE LOWER EXTREMITY

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Surgical Service of the Mount Sinai Hospital and the Daniel Baugh Institute of Anatomy of the Jefferson Medical College.

Arch Surg. 1939;38(3):412-416. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1939.01200090017002
Abstract

Hesse1 in 1929 directed attention to the occurrence of calorimetric changes in the skin of the lower extremity, resulting from irritation or pressure on the lumbar portion of the ganglionated cord and its connecting rami. Pressure or irritation affecting the lumbar portion of the ganglionated cord, whether it is of inflammatory or of neoplastic origin, may produce well defined changes in temperature of the skin of the corresponding lower extremity.2

The changes in temperature vary with the degree and type of pressure on the ganglionated cord. Mild pressure or irritation results in the appearance of increased vasoconstrictor phenomena in the corresponding lower extremity. Comparative estimations of the temperature of the skin of the lower extremity will disclose in such instances a decrease in temperature on the side on which retroperitoneal pressure is present. The increased vasoconstriction results in lessened blood volume and thus in lowering of the cutaneous

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