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Article
March 1939

EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION OF TUMORS OF THE BRAIN WITH THE SHOPE RABBIT PAPILLOMA

Author Affiliations

DURHAM, N. C.
From the Department of Surgery and the Laboratory of Experimental Neurology, the Duke School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1939;38(3):457-470. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1939.01200090062006
Abstract

Cutaneous papillomas developing in rabbits inoculated with the virus of infectious papillomatosis1 possess the characters of mammalian tumors2 and are readily susceptible to autotransplantation. Bits of hashed papilloma tissue implanted in muscle, subcutaneous tissue and inner organs of the host proliferate actively, invading or displacing adjacent tissue. In the absence of bacterial infection, cellular reaction about the growing implants is notably scanty; frequently none is present. Under these conditions the growth is a slowly enlarging mass which has little apparent effect on the surrounding tissues other than that attributable to pressure or to physical interference. This character of the transplanted papilloma has suggested its use in the study of the effects of pressure inside the cranial cavity. With this in mind, the behavior of the papilloma on implantation in various sites within the skulls of domestic rabbits has been studied. The results obtained are described in the present

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