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Article
March 1939

REGIONAL REDISTRIBUTION OF BLOOD IN EXPERIMENTAL SECONDARY SHOCK

Author Affiliations

MEMPHIS, TENN.; ST. JOSEPH, MO.
From the Departments of Surgery and Pathology, University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, Tenn., and the Department of Pathology, George Washington University College of Medicine, Washington, D. C.

Arch Surg. 1939;38(3):556-580. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1939.01200090163012
Abstract

Implied in the concept of physiologic homeostasis (Cannon1) is the occurrence of translocations of blood in response to normal and urgent stimuli. Such movements of blood have been investigated in relation to certain regions of the body, particularly the spleen (Barcroft and others2) and the lungs (Hochrein and Keller;3 David and Siedek4). The exact redistribution of blood in traumatic or hemorrhagic shock has been the subject of much debate. It is evident that the total mass of blood in any area is dependent on the local vascular tonus. That the tone of the blood vessels is altered by secondary shock is well known, but whether in the direction of vasodilatation or of vasoconstriction is not yet well established. The question is raised: Is the alteration of vascular tonus local or widespread? Accepting the observations of Goltz,5 who showed that a state of splanchnic vasodilatation could

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