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Article
May 1939

INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION IN MANALTERATIONS IN THE SERUM BASES AND THEIR SIGNIFICANCE

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
University of Otago Fellow.; From the Section on Clinical Biochemistry (Drs. Falconer and Osterberg) and the Division of Medicine (Dr. Bargen), the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Surg. 1939;38(5):869-885. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1939.01200110075007
Abstract

For more than twenty-five years the alterations which take place in the chemistry of the blood during intestinal obstruction have interested many workers, who have sought to explain the course and termination of unrelieved obstruction on the basis of the changes observed in the chemical constituents of the blood. In their turn, dehydration,1 azotemia2 and hypochloremia following excessive loss of chloride by vomiting3 have all been incriminated, but not one of these factors suffices to explain completely the clinical progress of patients who have intestinal obstruction. Falconer and Lyall4 observed the changes in the constituents of the blood in a number of cases of intestinal obstruction and found that uniformity does not characterize the biochemical changes in the blood of patients who have obstruction at any particular level of the intestine. In their cases, increase in the concentration of urea in the blood was the most

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