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Article
May 1939

EFFECTS ON KIDNEY AND BLOOD PRESSURE OF ARTIFICIAL COMMUNICATION BETWEEN RENAL ARTERY AND VEIN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Surgery of the New York Hospital and Cornell University Medical College.

Arch Surg. 1939;38(5):886-905. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1939.01200110092008
Abstract

Experimental studies on hypertension have demonstrated that in dogs an elevation of blood pressure can be produced and maintained by constricting the renal artery and decreasing the flow of blood through the kidney.1 We have reported a series of experiments in which we employed Goldblatt's method of producing hypertension. In the course of this experimental work it occurred to us that the flow of blood through the kidneys might be diminished by constructing an artificial opening between the renal artery and the renal vein so that part of the arterial blood would be diverted into the vein without passing through the kidney.

Since Carrel published his description2 of a uniformly satisfactory technic for making a vascular anastomosis, studies of the effects of experimentally produced arteriovenous fistulas have been reported by many authors. Two instances of this lesion between the renal vessels in human subjects have been reported,3

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