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Article
May 1939

RATE OF FIBROPLASIA AND DIFFERENTIATION IN THE HEALING OF CUTANEOUS WOUNDS IN DIFFERENT SPECIES OF ANIMALS

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.; NEW HAVEN, CONN.
From the Department of Surgery, the Yale University School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1939;38(5):934-945. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1939.01200110140011
Abstract

In the healing of wounds of muscle, fascia, skin and gastric wall of the dog, strength returns in a definite manner. During the first four days, the wounds have only the strength contributed by the sutures and the adhesion of the wound surfaces; subsequently, however, strength mounts rapidly, reaching a maximum on the twelfth to the fourteenth day of healing.1 This increase in strength is accompanied microscopically by regeneration of fibrous tissue; hence, strength is used as an index to the rate of fibroplasia. Because the rate of fibroplasia is the same in the healing of these diversified anatomic structures, it has occurred to us that the rate should be studied in the healing of wounds of one tissue in several species of animals. In this way any influence on the rate of fibroplasia due to differences in species could be determined. In the experiments described here, therefore, the

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