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Article
August 1939

CALCIFICATION OF THE SUPRASPINATUS TENDONCAUSE, PATHOLOGIC PICTURE AND RELATION TO THE SCALENUS ANTICUS SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

OKLAHOMA CITY
From the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Arch Surg. 1939;39(2):231-246. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1939.01200140063006
Abstract

A pathologic condition of the shoulder with a calcareous deposit which casts a shadow roentgenographically has become an increasingly popular subject since it was first described by Painter1 in 1907. Nevertheless, failure to correlate the cause, the pathologic picture and the pathogenesis with the symptoms seems to be rather general.

This article is an attempt to correlate the pathologic lesion with the symptoms produced and to rationalize the treatment.

INCIDENCE  Calcareous deposits about the shoulder are much more common than is generally believed. In reporting 200 cases of "periarthritis of the shoulder," Dickson2 found that 33.3 per cent showed a calcified deposit as revealed by the roentgenogram. Carnett,3a by routinely taking roentgenograms of both shoulders, disclosed that one fourth of his patients had bilateral deposits, only one shoulder being symptomatic at the time of examination.Since the adoption about one year ago of a new routine for

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