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Article
October 1939

PANCREATICOGASTROSTOMYEXPERIMENTAL TRANSPLANTATION OF THE PANCREAS INTO THE STOMACH

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Surgery of the New York Hospital and the Cornell University Medical College.

Arch Surg. 1939;39(4):530-550. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1939.01200160020002
Abstract

HISTORICAL CONSIDERATIONS  The early work of Brunner1 in 1682, as reported by Ceccherelli, demonstrated that partial extirpation of the pancreas did not impair the health and digestion of the experimental animal. This salient observation has led to the development of surgical procedures which have been successful as long as the main pancreatic and biliary ducts have been left intact. However, investigations concerning the feasibility of attacking the head of the pancreas and thereby excluding the external pancreatic secretion from the intestinal tract have led to conflicting results.A historical survey of these related experimental problems shows that the conflicts date from early time.The first experimental approach to this subject was carried out by Bernard.2 He occluded the pancreatic ducts by injecting them with paraffin and observed a marked disturbance in the absorption of fat from the intestinal tract, with early death of the animal. From this observation

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