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Article
October 1939

CORRELATION OF PATHOLOGIC AND CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOID APPENDICITIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Surgical Pathology of the New York Hospital and Cornell Medical College.

Arch Surg. 1939;39(4):577-585. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1939.01200160067004
Abstract

A correlation seems to exist between the pathologic diagnosis of a specific type of chronic appendicitis, namely, the chronic lymphoid, and a definite symptom complex, which is herein described. The pathologic changes consist of hyperplasia of the lymphoid elements and a variable degree of fibrosis and obliteration. The clinical picture is characterized by attacks of mild to moderately severe abdominal pain, with a high incidence of nausea and occasional associated episodes of vomiting, recurring over a period lasting from months to years and never being severe enough to fall into the category of acute appendicitis.

Many appendectomies have been performed on the basis of this symptom complex, after careful exclusion, by physical examination and laboratory aid, of other pathologic lesions. In my experience such operations have often revealed relatively innocuous-appearing appendixes. This paper attempts to correlate the gross and microscopic changes in such organs with clinical findings.

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