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Article
October 1939

JOINT CARTILAGE UNDER INFRAPHYSIOLOGIC, ULTRAPHYSIOLOGIC AND EUPHYSIOLOGIC DEMANDS

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medical Evangelists.

Arch Surg. 1939;39(4):596-623. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1939.01200160086006

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Abstract

The importance to osseous structures of functional efficiency is common knowledge. The Hueter-Volkmann pressure theory, Wolff's law of transformation of bone and Roux's principle of the functional stimuli of pressure and tension have been widely recognized, and the idea that osseous tissue apart from the important factor of heredity is in need of function for its development and preservation has been accepted even by the laity. Physicians are accustomed to observe that osseous tissue adapts itself to changes of functional conditions; it increases under augmented function and decreases in regions in which function is diminished, and this process of adaptation is associated with a complete change of its inner architecture—extensive replacement of the old osseous tissue by new tissue more fit for the new purpose. The process of resorption and apposition of bone which is continuously at work to fulfil the daily demands of altered statics is one of the

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