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Article
November 1939

SURGICAL EXCISION OF MATERIAL FOR BIOPSY IN THE LYMPHOMATOUS DISEASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Memorial Hospital for the Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases, the Lymphoma Clinic of Dr. Lloyd F. Craver.

Arch Surg. 1939;39(5):728-740. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1939.01200170039004
Abstract

For many years the primary lymphadenopathies, such as Hodgkin's disease, lymphosarcoma, Brill-Symmer's lymphadenopathy and the pseudoleukemic lymphomas, were diagnosed and differentiated by means of clinical signs and symptoms correlated with the history and the laboratory findings. Diagnostic tests have been devised, but none has received widespread use or acclaim, owing to variabilities and inconsistencies in interpretations and in technic. In the Memorial Hospital, histologic examination of material obtained by surgical excision is regarded as the most reliable guide for an accurate diagnosis in this group of diseases. This report is an attempt to clarify the confusion regarding certain aspects of excision, aspiration, punch and removal of a wedge as applied to biopsy in cases of the lymphomas.

In the ordinary routine of medical practice, the opportunities for excising a diseased lymph node are relatively rare. Patients who have diffuse lymphadenopathies are generally afflicted with Hodgkin's disease, lymphosarcoma, one of the

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