[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.204.161.30. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 1939

REACTIONS OF THE PERITONEUM TO TRAUMA AND INFECTIONFURTHER EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.
From the Department of Surgery, the University of Michigan.

Arch Surg. 1939;39(5):761-769. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1939.01200170072006
Abstract

In a consideration of the more common complications which occur after abdominal operations it is evident that none is more serious than peritonitis and none more deserving of careful study from the standpoint of both prevention and cure. While the incidence of postoperative peritonitis has gradually and steadily declined during the past several decades, the possibility of its occurrence remains one of the chief hazards of operations on the lower part of the intestinal tract, and this is particularly true when resections or anastomoses which involve the large bowel are performed. The general decrease in the occurrence of postoperative peritonitis has been the result of (1) improvements and standardization in operative technic; (2) perfection in anesthesia, and (3) a greater realization of the importance of a proper period of meticulous preoperative care. During this period (seven to ten days or more) the fluid and electrolyte balances are restored and nutritional

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×