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Article
January 1940

SUCCESSFUL AUTOTRANSPLANTATION OF THE ADRENAL GLAND IN THE DOG

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Laboratory of Surgical Research and the Department of Surgery of the Harvard Medical School.

Arch Surg. 1940;40(1):1-5. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1940.04080010004001
Abstract

Autotransplantation of the adrenal gland in the rat and in the guinea pig has been reported by a number of investigators.1 However, it is generally accepted that such a graft undergoes partial necrosis which is followed by regeneration of cortical tissue only. A successful transplantation of the whole adrenal gland in small animals has not been described.

Crowe and Wislocki2 were among the first to attempt to transplant the adrenal in the dog. They observed that when fragments of the gland were placed in muscle only the cortical tissue survived. Such transplants were found to be functionless. Oldberg3 and Blodinger and his co-workers4 also were unable to obtain functioning autogenous grafts of the adrenal in the dog. Recently, however, Levy and Blalock5 have reported transplantation of the kidney together with the adrenal to the neck (with reestablishment of the blood supply by suture of vessels)

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