February 1940


Arch Surg. 1940;40(2):161-162. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1940.04240010001001

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During the past decade there has been widespread interest in disorders of the peripheral circulation. This has led to the establishment of special clinics for the study and treatment of these conditions in a large number of medical centers in the United States. In spite of the continued lack of accurate knowledge of the underlying causes, much has been learned regarding the care of patients suffering from inadequate arterial flow to the extremities. Most of the disorders resulting from this condition have certain common characteristics, and the same general principles of management can be applied to them. Although the types of disability encountered in patients suffering from peripheral lesions associated with diseased veins are different in many respects from those encountered in patients with narrowed arteries, their management has usually been taken over by the special clinics interested in the whole problem of peripheral circulation. Concentrated interest in such conditions

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