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Article
May 1940

SITUS INVERSUS TOTALIS AND DISEASE OF THE BILIARY TRACTSURVEY OF THE LITERATURE AND REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.
From the Department of Surgery of Vanderbilt University.

Arch Surg. 1940;40(5):885-896. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1940.04080040067007
Abstract

Transposition of viscera has been recognized since the days of Aristotle (who recorded observations on 2 instances of transposed organs in animals), but it was not until 1600 A. D. that Fabricius described a a case of reversed liver and spleen in the human being.1 Petrius Servius recorded a case of transposition of the viscera in 1615,2 and Kuchenmeister (1824) first recognized the condition in a living person.1 Subsequent to this clinical pioneering, sporadic cases were reported throughout the literature, but the true incidence was not appreciated until the modern era began, in 1897, with Vehsemeyer's3 demonstration of transposition by means of the roentgen rays. This mode of examination has made confirmation of the anomaly relatively simple, and the incidence of reported cases has increased accordingly. Cleveland,4 in 1926, found approximately 400 cases of transposition in the literature, and Larson5 estimated that there have

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