[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.65.30. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1940

TRAUMATIC INTRACEREBRAL HEMORRHAGEWITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO ITS PATHOGENESIS AND ITS RELATION TO "DELAYED TRAUMATIC APOPLEXY"

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the Department of Neurology, College of Medical Evangelists, and the Cajal Laboratory of Neuropathology, Los Angeles County Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1940;41(1):1-28. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1940.01210010004001
Abstract

To those familiar with the effects of trauma on the brain and its envelopes, the importance of the mechanism by which the injury is produced in interpreting the pathologic picture is quite evident. Each type of injury is now known to produce its own characteristic train of lesions. The appalling increase in craniocerebral injuries consequent to traffic accidents has brought into prominence a number of effects which appear to be the direct consequence of striking of a stationary or relatively stationary object by the head in motion. These effects have been long described as coup-contrecoup effects. One of the lesions belonging to this group which to date has not been given any selective attention is gross hemorrhage into the cerebral substance—traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage.

In 1891, Bollinger described 4 cases in which death occurred rather suddenly from twelve to fifty days after an injury to the head and proved at autopsy

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×