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Article
July 1940

PATHOLOGY OF SHOCK IN MANVISCERAL EFFECTS OF TRAUMA, HEMORRHAGE, BURNS AND SURGICAL OPERATIONS

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS
From the Department of Pathology of the University of Tennessee School of Medicine and the Department of Surgery of the School of Medicine of Louisiana State University.

Arch Surg. 1940;41(1):123-146. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1940.01210010126012
Abstract

Present knowledge of the syndrome of shock in man rests largely on physiologic investigations in lower animals. Studies of pathologic changes are decidedly more limited, and Moon and Kennedy1 deserve much credit for drawing attention to the importance of these alterations.

The present study is concerned with the visceral changes present in 50 patients who died in a state clinically diagnosed as shock and on whom postmortem examinations were performed from one to three hours later. An effort has been made to demonstrate that definite alterations occur in the viscera as the result of shock and that the character of these changes is dependent on the etiologic factors involved. The changes are grouped according to the clinical states from which they arose, and their significance is briefly discussed. These states include:

1. Cerebral trauma—10 cases

A. Early death

B. Delayed death

2. Trauma to the abdomen, thorax or extremities—31

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