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Article
August 1940

GAS GANGRENEWITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE IMPORTANCE OF WOOL AS A SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS
From the Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, and the Charity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans.

Arch Surg. 1940;41(2):393-402. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1940.01210020189019
Abstract

Every great war has always been more destructive than constructive from the medical point of view. However, certain facts have come out of the results of destruction which, when properly evaluated, have done something for the advancement of knowledge. The studies of shock, hemorrhage, compound fractures, thoracic surgery and the care of wounds during the World War have all brought about improvement in surgical treatment. The care of wounds, particularly with regard to infections, is certainly better understood since surgeons have had time to evaluate the accomplishments of surgery since 1918. In the present state of world unrest, surgeons may again be faced with the necessity for studying wounds, particularly with regard to the anaerobic infections.

The history of gas gangrene has been reviewed frequently, and another such account would be superfluous. The incidence of this infection in civil life, the source of contamination and the methods of prevention are

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