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Article
October 1940

ACUTE METASTATIC SPINAL EPIDURAL ABSCESSREPORT OF TWO CASES WITH RECOVERY FOLLOWING LAMINECTOMY

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the Department of Surgery of the University of Southern California.

Arch Surg. 1940;41(4):994-1003. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1940.01210040183010
Abstract

As can be appreciated from a review of the literature, the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of acute metastatic spinal epidural abscess may be divided into two epochs. According to Van Den Berg,1 the first of these, from the initial report of Morgagni2 until the end of 1928, was, to say the least, despairing, for of 36 patients whose cases were reported only 1 recovered, a mortality of over 97 per cent. Beginning with 1929, a distinct improvement occurred. Of 35 patients described, 19 survived, a mortality of 46 per cent. Of the 20 patients who recovered, however, 5 had some residual paralysis. Browder and Meyers3 followed Van Den Berg's paper with a report of 5 cases of acute metastatic spinal epidural abscess, in 1 of which the patient recovered. The condition in this case, however, represented an extension of osteomyelitis of the rib. During December of the

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