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Article
November 1940

PARENTERAL ADMINISTRATION OF A WATERSOLUBLE COMPOUND WITH VITAMIN K ACTIVITY4-AMINO-2-METHYL-1-NAPHTHOL HYDROCHLORIDE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery of the University of Illinois College of Medicine and the Cook County Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1940;41(5):1244-1250. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1940.01210050204012
Abstract

A water-soluble compound with vitamin K activity, 4-amino-2-methyl-1-naphthol hydrochloride, has been synthesized by Doisy and his associates.1 The oil-soluble vitamin K, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, has been found very active when administered orally,2 but since it is relatively insoluble in water, it is inconvenient for parenteral use. Parenteral administration of vitamin K has several advantages over oral administration. By the oral route, there may be a lack of absorption due to intestinal obstruction, paralytic ileus or some other intestinal complication. By the parenteral route the vitamin may be given to patients who are unable to take it orally because of nausea or vomiting. In the treatment of hemorrhagic disease of the newborn, for which vitamin K is very effective, the parenteral method is especially indicated. When the substance is administered parenterally it is not necessary to give bile salts. With oral administration bile salts must be present in order to assure

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