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Article
May 1941

DIFFERENTIAL SENSITIVITY OF SARCOMA AND NORMAL TISSUES TO TEMPORARY ARREST OF CIRCULATION

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
From the Department of Physiology, the University of Minnesota.

Arch Surg. 1941;42(5):917-928. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1941.01210110119010
Abstract

Warburg, Wind and Negelein1 suggested that tumor cells should be particularly sensitive to lack of nutrition because of their high metabolic rate. This conception seems to be borne out by the fact that Jensen's sarcoma undergoes extensive necrosis in rats which are exposed to 5 per cent oxygen for forty hours.1 Okamoto2 and Warburg. Wind and Negelein1 have shown that tumor cells remain viable after prolonged exposure to environments lacking either dextrose or oxygen. In a medium lacking both dextrose and oxygen, however, tumor cells die very rapidly; so it was found impossible to transplant the Jensen sarcoma after only four hours in such a medium. Furthermore, when a tumor-bearing animal was killed and kept at 37 C. for four hours after death, slices of tumor tissue placed in a medium containing dextrose and oxygen no longer metabolized, indicating irreversible destruction of the tumor cells.1

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