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Article
June 1941

EFFECTS OF UNCOMPLICATED HEMOCONCENTRATION (ERYTHROCYTOSIS)WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO SHOCK

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.; NASHVILLE, TENN.
From the Department of Surgery of Vanderbilt University.

Arch Surg. 1941;42(6):1019-1025. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1941.01210120054005
Abstract

An increase in the concentration of the red blood corpuscles occurs in many abnormal conditions, notably in secondary shock. The hemoconcentration associated with secondary shock results from the loss of plasma, local or diffuse or both. This results in a reduction in the circulating blood volume. The total number of circulating erythrocytes in the absence of gross injury remains constant or is moderately increased, depending on the discharge of cells from the splenic reservoir.

As has been stated, hemoconcentration is usually accompanied with a decrease in the blood volume, and it is difficult if not impossible to assess the roles exercised by each of these two factors in the resulting alterations. The purpose of the present experiments was to determine the effects of hemoconcentration, uncomplicated as far as possible by alterations in the blood pressure and blood volume, on the general condition of the animal and the appearance of the

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