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Article
June 1941

A COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF HEAT AND THOSE OF COLD IN THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF SHOCK

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.
From the Departments of Surgery and Biochemistry of Vanderbilt University.

Arch Surg. 1941;42(6):1054-1059. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1941.01210120089010
Abstract

There has been a revival of interest in recent years in the reactions of living matter to changes in temperature. From the therapeutic point of view the effects of fever therapy in the treatment of infections, of low temperatures in the retardation of growth of cancer1 and of cooling parts with deficient circulation in the prevention of gangrene2 have been studied. In addition to determining the effects of different temperatures on the local tissues in which the circulation was inadequate, Allen2b found that constriction of the circulation of the thigh is more apt to be accompanied with shock if the local temperature is high than if it is low.

Because of the variability in individual responses to various means of producing shock, such as trauma and the removal of blood, it is extremely difficult to compare the effects of various therapeutic agents. In other words, the variation

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