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Article
June 1941

BASIS AND TREATMENT OF CALCIFICATION OF TENDINOCAPSULAR TISSUES, ESPECIALLY THE SUPRASPINATUS TENDON

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
Brown Orthopedic Research Fellow.; From the Orthopedic and Laboratory Divisions, Hospital for Joint Diseases.

Arch Surg. 1941;42(6):1065-1071. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1941.01210120100012
Abstract

Much has been written regarding the treatment of calcification of tendinocapsular tissues, especially in the region of the supraspinatus tendon.1 Little attention, however, has been paid to the question of the cause of this abnormal deposition of calcium. Most writers support the idea that trauma is the main causative agent. We felt it difficult to accept this opinion, since our experience included several subjects presenting multiple widespread areas of calcification without any clearcut evidence of trauma (accompanying illustration). In fact, it appears that calcification of the tendinocapsular tissues may be the result of a general disorder, possibly metabolic, and that any traumatic influence present merely precipitates the onset of local symptoms.2

Along these lines we noted the interesting experiments of Goettsch and Pappenheimer, Evans and others, which showed the production of degeneration, necrosis and calcification of voluntary muscle fibers in certain animals fed a diet deficient in vitamin

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