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Article
June 1941

A NEW METHOD FOR PHYSIOLOGIC DECOMPRESSION AFTER GASTRIC OPERATIONSPRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Surgical Service of the Sinai Hospital of Baltimore.

Arch Surg. 1941;42(6):1083-1085. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1941.01210120118014

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Abstract

Surgeons have for many years attempted decompression of the stomach after gastroenterostomy or subtotal gastric resection. This was finally accomplished with the Wangensteen suction method, and the morbidity and mortality of gastric surgical procedures were materially reduced. However, experimental work by Peters and others has shown that acid ions (chiefly chlorides), when removed from the stomach by prolonged vomiting or by continuous suction drainage, cannot be replaced by the parenteral administration of saline solution, because of the cellular depletion of acid ions with the resultant base retention and cellular edema. It was thus shown that the disrupted acid-base equilibrium can be reestablished only after prolonged oral administration of the required acid components. The continued maintenance, therefore, of the acid-base equilibrium from the time of the operation is likely to prevent to some degree the usual edema at the stoma. The obvious answer to the problem is replacement of the normal

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