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Article
July 1941

PHYSIOLOGIC EFFECTS OF HIGH CONCENTRATIONS OF OXYGEN IN EXPERIMENTAL SECONDARY SHOCK

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS
From the Department of Surgery of the School of Medicine of Louisiana State University.

Arch Surg. 1941;43(1):1-13. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1941.01210130004001
Abstract

Despite the widespread use of oxygen therapy for clinical shock, few studies have been made of the effect of high concentrations of oxygen in experimental shock. The rationale of the method is based on the fall of oxygen consumption associated with hemorrhagic and traumatic shock, which was first pointed out by Aub and Cunningham1 and which has since been confirmed by many other workers. The present report concerns a series of experiments undertaken to investigate the physiologic action of high concentrations of oxygen on normal control animals and experimental animals in which secondary shock had been produced.

MATERIALS AND METHODS  Dogs weighing from 10 to 25 pounds (4.5 to 11.3 Kg.) were kept under light anesthesia produced by intravenous injection of pentobarbital sodium in doses of 1/4 grain (0.015 Gm.) per kilogram of body weight. The arterial blood pressure was recorded with a mercury manometer by means of a

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