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Article
July 1941

ACTUAL GROWTH OF YOUNG CARTILAGE TRANSPLANTS IN RABBITSEXPERIMENTAL STUDIES

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURGH
From the Department of Surgery, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, and the Presbyterian Hospital, New York.

Arch Surg. 1941;43(1):32-63. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1941.01210130035004
Abstract

In the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery the transplantation of cartilage has assumed a role of increasing importance. During the past seventy-five years many reports have appeared in the literature describing the experimental and clinical results of the use of cartilage grafts, but the conclusions presented have often been contradictory. At present the evidence for survival of autografts of cartilage is admitted readily, but similar proof for the viability of isotransplants1 is not so conclusive. Observations as to whether cartilage grafts were living or dead have depended on the gross and microscopic appearance of apparently viable cartilage cells at the time of removal of the graft. It has been assumed that if a transplant of very young cartilage remains viable in all probability it will resume its regular rate of growth. A demonstrable increase in size of the graft, correlated with the macroscopic and microscopic appearance, would present

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