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Article
August 1941

PROBLEM OF ANOXIA IN SURGERY AND ANESTHESIAREPORT OF EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL CASES AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, KAN.
From the Department of Surgery and the Hixon Laboratory of Medical Research, University of Kansas Hospitals.

Arch Surg. 1941;43(2):169-185. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1941.01210140003001
Abstract

"Anoxemia not only stops the machine but wrecks the machinery." Only a great pioneer in the study of respiration like Haldane1 could have spoken such truth. His words should be foremost in the mind of every surgeon dealing with a patient in shock. They should be foremost in the mind of every anesthetist dealing with a narcotized patient, because asphyxia is one of the dangers present in all forms of anesthesia. The health and the very life of the patient depend on the surgeon's knowledge and skill in preventing and averting anoxia. The number of deaths under anesthesia is appalling. Jarman2 collected statistics from the hospitals of all the English-speaking countries. He received detailed reports of nearly 1,300 deaths under anesthesia between 1921 and 1939. Of this series of approximately 1,300 detailed cases the following classifications were made: When the anesthetic was specified the number of deaths under

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