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October 1941

PROGRESS IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY FOR 1940A REVIEW PREPARED BY AN EDITORIAL BOARD OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEONS

Arch Surg. 1941;43(4):645-734. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1941.01210160106014
Abstract

VII. INFANTILE PARALYSIS 

General Considerations.  —Members of the medical profession and laymen as well are becoming more interested in poliomyelitis owing to the interest of many lay organizations and to the activities of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, such as grants in aid of research work, publications, special training of nurses and physical therapeutists and establishment of research fellowships for physicians.During 1940 confirmation of the transmission of poliomyelitis to animals other than man and the monkey has been reported, and evidence demonstrating the alimentary tract as a pathway of entrance of the virus and spread of the disease has been adduced. Discussion of the use of hot moist applications during the acute stage of the disease has been reopened. There is an increasing trend of thought away from absolute, continuous, rigid immobilization of joints. Indirect laboratory evidence that a disease caused by a neurotropic virus can be successfully

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