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Article
November 1941

PROGRESS IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY FOR 1940A REVIEW PREPARED BY AN EDITORIAL BOARD OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEONS

Arch Surg. 1941;43(5):866-932. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1941.01210170133011
Abstract

XIV. CONDITIONS INVOLVING HIP JOINT 

Anatomy and Physiology.  —The use of multiple drill holes to revascularize the head of the femur has now become common. Compere, Garrison and Fahey428 have investigated experimentally the possibility of permanent injury to the capital and greater trochanteric epiphyses by multiple drilling. One or both of the two major growth centers of the proximal end of one femur in each of 27 goats 6 weeks old were subjected to operative trauma by curettage or multiple drilling. After maturity had been reached, nineteen months later, the animals were killed, necropsy was performed, and the femurs were removed for study, measurement and roentgen examination. The authors conclude that surgical trauma to the greater trochanteric epiphyses by drilling or curettage causes arrest of growth with resulting deformity and shortening of the greater trochanter and associated coxa vara. Similar surgical trauma to the epiphysial cartilage plate of the

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