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Article
February 1942

EFFECT OF THE ADMINISTRATION OF LIPOCAIC AND CHOLESTEROL IN RABBITS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, the University of Chicago.

Arch Surg. 1942;44(2):260-267. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1942.01210200076006
Abstract

If rabbits are fed cholesterol in excessive amounts, a marked and sustained elevation of the blood cholesterol level occurs, and after a few months progressive intimal changes appear in the aorta.1 Cholesterol and other lipids2 are deposited in the inner layers of the aorta, and gradually lesions develop which assume most of the characteristics of human arteriosclerosis.3 These findings suggest that this disease may be the result of some metabolic defect and not a necessary accompaniment of the aging process. The abnormally high incidence of presenile arteriosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus supports this view. Here also there is evidence that some disturbance in fat metabolism resulting in sustained hypercholesteremia is involved. Rabinowitch,4 Joslin5 and others have demonstrated that high fat diets given to patients with diabetes favor, and that, conversely, low fat—high carbohydrate diets retard, the appearance of hypercholesteremia and arteriosclerosis. The discovery in

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