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Article
March 1942

LEG-SHORTENING OPERATION FOR EQUALIZING LEG LENGTH

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the New York Orthopedic Dispensary and Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1942;44(3):543-555. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1942.01210210147010
Abstract

Unequal leg length has always been an important and common orthopedic problem. It may be due to any of a variety of causes and in a large proportion of cases can be prevented. Joint dislocation, shortening or overgrowth of one bone or of the whole extremity may be responsible. Congenital dislocation of the hip is the most common cause of unequal leg length in infancy, but congenital shortening or absence of one or more bones may occur. Congenital dislocation can usually be corrected by early reduction. Suppurative arthritis of the hip, especially if drainage is delayed, often results in partial or complete absorption of the femoral head and neck, or partial or complete dislocation of the hip, with resultant shortening. Such shortening can usually be prevented by early adequate drainage of the original focus and of the joint and chemical treatment of the infection. Arthritis or osteomyelitis may sufficiently damage

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