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Article
May 1942

PREPARATION FOR OPERATION AND POSTOPERATIVE CARE OF THE PATIENT WITH CANCERREVIEW OF CONTEMPORARY ADVANCES AND ANALYSIS OF EXPERIENCES WITH CURRENT CLINICAL PROCEDURES

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the surgical service of Brooklyn Cancer Institute.

Arch Surg. 1942;44(5):840-880. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1942.01210230064006
Abstract

As the prevalence of cancer increases in accordance with the increasing longevity and advancing age constitution of the general population and as the respective curative spheres of resective and radiation therapies become more sharply defined, the special problems besetting operation on patients with cancer loom larger. Studies in operative care most frequently have been directed toward the general run of operative patients, predominantly persons requiring emergency or elective procedures and constituting for the most part relatively good operative risks. The need for surgical advancement in the field of cancer, in which the prospects hitherto have been held among the least promising, assumes imperative proportions as malignant disease becomes numerically the second most frequent cause of death. There can be no question but that progress will be painstakingly slow, but increased emphasis on the surgical requirements of this clinical group of patients must be forthcoming if medicine is to accept the

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