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Article
June 1942

HEMOSTATIC EFFECT OF OXALIC ACIDCLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS, WITH A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

Professor of Clinical Surgery, Wayne University College of Medicine; DETROIT
From the Department of Surgery, Alexander Blain Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1942;44(6):1117-1125. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1942.01210240156013
Abstract

Despite normal coagulation and ordinarily careful hemostasis, sufficient blood may be lost during and following operative procedures, chiefly from capillary oozing, to produce such complications as serum collection, wound infection and disruption and even postoperative shock. Delayed convalescence often results. If during or immediately after operation, a drug could safely be administered to the patient which would definitely hasten coagulation, it would constitute a valuable adjunct to mechanical hemostasis and an important advancement in operative surgery. This is true when the coagulation time is normal and more particularly so when it is delayed.

Several commercial products claimed to accelerate blood coagulation have been available for some time. Aggeler and Lucia,1 in a recent biologic assay of seventeen of these products, found that nine were practically inactive in vitro. The only products found to be significantly active were those suitable for local or oral use. It can readily be deduced,

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