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Article
July 1942

GANGLION CELL TUMOR (GANGLIOGLIOMA) IN THE THIRD VENTRICLEOPERATIVE REMOVAL WITH CLINICAL RECOVERY

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the neurosurgical service of Dr. Carl W. Rand, Los Angeles County Hospital and the Department of Surgery (Neurological), University of Southern California School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1942;45(1):129-139. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1942.01220010132009
Abstract

Ganglion cell tumors of the brain are not common. However, owing to increasing interest in the subject during the past ten years these growths are now known to be less rare than once was believed. In 1937, Wolf and Morton1 reviewed 48 cases of intracranial ganglion cell neoplasm found in the literature and added 2 of their own. In 14 cases in their review, the tumor arose in or near the third ventricle; the first case of this kind was described by Robertson in 1915.

No successful removal of a ganglion cell tumor in the third ventricle has been reported. The patient of Alpers and Grant2 failed to survive partial extirpation. Dandy,3 in his monograph, reported no cases of this kind, although in 3 of the cases he reported there were solid growths of uncertain cellular type resembling pineal tissue. In the majority of cases in which

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