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Article
August 1942

SHOCK PRODUCED BY CRUSH INJURYEFFECTS OF THE ADMINISTRATION OF PLASMA AND THE LOCAL APPLICATION OF COLD

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
William Stewart Halsted Fellow in Surgery.; From the Department of Surgery, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1942;45(2):183-194. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1942.01220020003001
Abstract

In a previous paper1 we described a method for producing experimental shock in which an attempt was made to simulate the crush syndrome in patients. The method consisted in placing a posterior extremity of the anesthetized animal in a mechanical press which had uneven surfaces. It was found that removal of the extremity from the press after five hours was followed by swelling of the thigh, an increase in the concentration of the blood, a decline in blood pressure, oliguria, abnormal urinary findings, elevated blood creatine and creatinuria and usually death. There was a large loss of plasma into and near the crushed area.

Only 1 of 19 animals in which the press was in place for five hours survived, despite the fact that all the animals appeared to be in good condition at the time the press was removed. On the other hand, it was found that 15

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