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Article
October 1942

MESENTERIC VASCULAR OCCLUSIONREVIEW OF THE LITERATURE AND GENERAL PRINCIPLES; REPORT OF A CASE WITH OPERATION AND RECOVERY

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.
From Grace Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1942;45(4):647-652. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1942.01220040143015
Abstract

Occlusion of the mesenteric vessels is not the rare occurrence of years ago, for today practically every busy surgeon encounters 1 or more cases. Although the underlying pathologic lesions appear to be many, the resulting clinical picture is fairly characteristic and makes possible an early and definite diagnosis in the majority of cases. The mortality rate associated with mesenteric vascular occlusion is still high and can be reduced only by earlier diagnosis and treatment. Whittaker and Pemberton,1 reporting 19 cases as late as 1938, had a mortality rate of 84 per cent following surgical intervention. The lowest recorded mortality rate in any significant series is in the region of 60 per cent.

The history of mesenteric occlusion is about a hundred years old, for Tiedemann2 reported the first case in 1843. Virchow was the first to recognize and explain embolism and thrombosis, and the knowledge of these processes

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