[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1942

LYMPHOSARCOMA OF THE INTESTINEREPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.
From the Department of Pathology, University of Oregon Medical School, and St. Luke's Hospital, San Francisco.

Arch Surg. 1942;45(6):945-956. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1942.01220060084006
Abstract

The relative rarity of tumors of the small intestine as compared with their frequency in the stomach and the large intestine is a common observation. It is further noted that the clinical manifestations of tumors in the stomach and the colon are more definite and readily recognized, while similar lesions in the small bowel are usually furtive and obscure, present variable and vague symptoms and even though suspected are found only by exploratory operations or at autopsy. This is true of lymphosarcoma, which, however, is one of the more common sarcomas of the gastrointestinal tract.

Although obscured by inaccurate terminology, certain well recognized types of sarcoma of the small bowel have been recorded. Speese,1 in a summary of 99 different sarcomas of the small intestine, recorded the following types, in the order of their frequency; round cell sarcoma, 43; lymphosarcoma, 34; spindle cell sarcoma, 13; fibrosarcoma, 3; myxosarcoma, 2;

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×