[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.124.106. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 1943

WOUND HEALINGEFFECT OF A STERILE ABSCESS ON FIBROPLASIA IN WOUND HEALING

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; PHILADELPHIA
From the Harrison Department of Surgical Research, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1943;46(1):40-48. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220070043004
Abstract

The intermediary stages of the metabolism of endogenous protein have been the subject of considerable interest from the time of the earliest studies on the physiology and biochemistry of nutrition. Recently interest has been renewed or accentuated because of the increasing recognition of the importance of hypoproteinemic states in clinical medicine. The recent attempts by Elman, Farr and others1 to build up tissue and plasma protein by supplying protein precursors intravenously emphasized the need for greater knowledge concerning the utilization of these materials by the organism.

One of the least understood phases in this endogenous cycle is the fate of the protein-split products released by catabolism of tissue protein. It is important to know whether these products are available, wholly or in part, for the repair of damaged tissues and for the replenishment of protein stores in the liver and the circulating plasma.

Madden and Whipple and co-workers2

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×