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Article
February 1943

EFFECTS OF LOWERING TEMPERATURE OF AN INJURED EXTREMITY TO WHICH A TOURNIQUET HAS BEEN APPLIED

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Department of Surgery of the Johns Hopkins University and Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1943;46(2):167-170. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220080003001
Abstract

In 10 experiments1 performed recently in which a tourniquet was applied to a severely injured extremity for a five hour period and in which treatment consisted in the administration of blood plasma, it was found that death occurred in all instances and that the average period of survival was only fourteen hours. In 10 other experiments which were identical in execution, except that a tourniquet was not used, 8 animals recovered and the remaining 2 lived four and twelve days, respectively.

The present experiments were performed in order to determine the systemic effects of reducing the temperature of an injured extremity to which a tourniquet has been applied.

METHODS AND RESULTS 

Procedure.  —Large animals were used in all the experiments. Pain was prevented by the use of soluble pentobarbital U. S. P. (pentobarbital sodium) and morphine. Injury was caused by striking one of the posterior extremities many blows with

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