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Article
February 1943

DELETERIOUS EFFECTS OF ANOXIA ON THE LIVER OF THE HYPERTHYROID ANIMAL

Author Affiliations

COOPERSTOWN, N. Y.
From the Surgical Research Laboratory, Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1943;46(2):171-185. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220080007002
Abstract

It has been recognized for some time that persons with thyrotoxicosis and animals in which a state of hyperthyroidism has been artificially produced are particularly sensitive to anoxia. The extraordinary sensitivity of thyroid-fed rats to want of oxygen was first brought out by Asher and Duran,1 who showed that animals with hyperthyroidism did not tolerate even minor degrees of anoxia. The behavior picture presented by the rats in their experiments was characterized by dyspnea, unrest and convulsive movements; the animals finally became unable to move, were obviously dangerously ill and died unless air was given. Normal rats at the same oxygen tension were relatively unaffected. Streuli and Asher2 had earlier found the converse to be true, namely, that thyroidectomized rats were able to tolerate a lack of oxygen which brought normal animals to the point of death by asphyxiation. In 1941 Barach and associates3 confirmed the work

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