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Article
February 1943

DELAYED SPLENIC RUPTURE: A CLINICAL SYNDROME FOLLOWING TRAUMAREPORT OF FOUR CASES WITH AN ANALYSIS OF ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-SEVEN CASES COLLECTED FROM THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

DETROIT
From the Division of General Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1943;46(2):186-213. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220080022003
Abstract

Acute conditions within the abdomen remain among the most important and at the same time most complicated of all surgical syndromes. In the present state of war interest in traumatic injuries is increased, with good reason. The type of acute abdominal injury to be discussed in this paper has not received the attention that its frequency warrants. This syndrome differs from other examples of acute abdominal conditions in that a latent period varying from a matter of hours to days or even weeks may follow the original trauma. During this latent period the patient may complain of an associated injury, such as a fracture of a long bone or a rib; he may be troubled by vague abdominal pain, or he may actually be almost symptom free. Then in typical cases a gradually developing splenic hematoma suddenly ruptures and the patient presents signs of collapse, shock and severe anemia; if

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