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Article
February 1943

CLOT RESISTANCE IN MICE AND THE MECHANISM OF HEMOSTASIS

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, KAN.; NEW YORK
From the Hixon Laboratory for Medical Research, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City.

Arch Surg. 1943;46(2):224-237. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220080060005
Abstract

During previous studies we found that movement of the tail had a slight effect or none in prolonging the duration of bleeding from a wound in the tail in normal mice. In heparinized mice, however, such movements initiated bleeding which persisted several minutes.1 We also observed that some of the mice treated with heparin or dicoumarin (3,3′-methylene-bis-[4-hydroxycoumarin])2 which had normal bleeding times continued to bleed spontaneously from the same wound after completion of the test. In an attempt to elucidate the lack of correlation between the bleeding time and this tendency to spontaneous bleeding from the same prick wound, further experiments were done. Macfarlane3 has drawn attention to the fact that there is no satisfactory method to test the toughness of blood clots. We proposed to estimate clot resistance,4 that is, the firmness of a clot and its adhesiveness, in a wound in the tail of

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